Mime Games

During the performance, the Master Weavers use mime to pretend that they are using the loom and creating the magical fabric. Below are some games to get your class using mime skills, helping them to use their imagination, discover their body language and improve their dexterity.

Hide and Seek

Get the group into pairs and ask them to name themselves A or B. A must then think of an object that they are going to hide behind without telling B. A must then mime hiding behind the object to see if B can guess what it is.  They then swap and B thinks of an object. This game can also be done in small groups.

The transforming object

The group stand in a circle and an object is placed in the middle, perhaps a ball of yarn or a piece of material. One by one the group must enter the circle and change the object into something it isn’t and must mime using it. An example could be a ball of yarn becoming a phone, a musical instrument or a television remote. You could extend this exercise by using the object the group create to spark small improvisations using the objects.

Extension: Using the same framework the leader explains to the class that they have an invisible ball of dough. This dough can be moulded into anything. Once the leader has demonstrated moulding the dough into something, maybe a dog, they then pass on the dog and the next person must re-mould the dough into something new. This game allows for spontaneity and so the items the groups mould should be the first thing that comes into their head.

What are you doing?

The group stand in a circle and one volunteer (A) goes into the middle and performs an action (eg. Putting in a light bulb). Another volunteer (B) then must go into the middle of the circle and ask (A) “What are you doing?”. (A) must then reply with a new action different to the one they are doing (eg. Riding a motorbike) and (B) must mime this.

Hot Chocolate on a Cold Day

This game is much like the traditional “Grandmother’s Footsteps” or “Hot Chocolate”.

Part One

One volunteer is chosen and must stand at the end of the room with their back turned. This person then becomes the snowman. The rest of the group must all stand at the other end of the room. The aim of the game is for the group to make their way to the snowman without being caught. When the snowman turns around the group must freeze and anyone caught moving is sent back to the beginning.

It is probably best to play this version of the game a few times first before moving onto the next section.

Part Two

This is set on a snowy winters morning. The group are told that before they reach the Snowman they must complete 5 mimed actions:

1. Wake up (stretching their arms)

2. Putting on clothes (trousers, coat and hat)

3. Running down the stairs

4. Opening the front door

5. Fighting the blizzard of snow (putting their hands in front of their face) towards the snowman.

The same rules apply as in part one with these added actions.

In my sewing kit

The group are split into pairs and told to stand by their imaginary sewing kit. When the leader orders the group to start, one person from each pair must open their sewing kit (a box, or basket for example) and take out invisible objects from their kit. This could include needles, materials, thread etc and should be done as quick as possible with their partner encouraging them to keep going. Once they have paused for more than 10 seconds they swap over and the other person repeats this. All of the items taken from the sewing basket must be mimed and shared with their partner.

Changing object

The group stand in a circle and an object is placed in the middle, perhaps a ball of yarn or a piece of material. One by one the group must enter the circle and change the object into something it isn’t and must mime using it. An example could be a ball of yarn becoming a phone, a musical instrument or a television remote. You could extend this exercise by using the object the group create to spark small improvisations using the objects.

Yes lets!

The group are put into pairs or small groups and take it in turns to suggest an activity such as “Let’s go climbing”. The other member(s) of the group must answer “yes lets” to every suggestion and must mime it together. Allow everyone to input an idea so that the partners/groups all have a go at suggesting.

Extension: To extend the exercise why not play as a whole group.

Take a walk

(preparation required)

The group stand in a huddle so that they can all interact with each other. The leader explains that today the group are going on an adventure. The group begin by moving around the classroom narrated by the leader who will soon begin to add in new settings and tasks ahead of them. These could include:

•       Walking through sticky mud

•       Climbing over branches

•       Wading through water

•       Crawling under a bridge

•       Walking on hot coals

This exercise improves the groups mime work within a situation and allows they to actively take part in the story.

Just what I’ve always wanted!

Sit the children in a circle on the floor.  Tell them you have brought an imaginary box with you and that inside is something that you have always wanted.  Tell them to watch you closely. Mime placing the box in front of you and carefully opening the flaps and looking inside. Mime slowly and clearly taking out and using something that you have always wanted.  It could be an animal or an item of jewelry or anything that is ‘mimeable’.

Once you have done your mime ask the children if they want to guess what it is. Whoever gets it right can take the box to continue or it can go to any volunteer who wants to show us what is inside.

Share and Enjoy

| More

Leave a reply